Category Archives: Life after detention

New Zealand’s offer to resettle 150 offshore refugees a year never taken up

January 11, 2016 | theguardian

Refugees on Nauru plead with the NZ prime minister, John Key, to be resettled but its immigration minister says the decision is up to Australia

The Nauru detention centre from which 28 refugees have written to the NZ government seeking resettlement.
 The Nauru detention centre from which 28 refugees have written to the NZ government seeking resettlement.

A two-year-old offer from New Zealand to resettle 150 refugees a year from Australia’s offshore detention centres remains untouched by a reluctant Australian government, despite a public plea from people on Nauru.

The New Zealand government has since reallocated this year’s places to Syrian refugees but says the offer remains part of its official immigration policy and open to the Australian government.

Last week 28 refugees on Nauru wrote to the New Zealand prime minister, John Key, asking to be resettled in that country under the Australia-New Zealand agreement.

The refugees have been found to have a well-founded fear of persecution in their homelands but have been offered only temporary residence in Nauru.

“Australia will not accept us despite us asking them for safety,” the handwritten letter, signed and affixed with the refugees’ boat numbers, says.

“They gave us to the Nauru government and told us we were now their responsibility. Nauru has not given us, and does not have the means to give us, permanent protection and safety.

“After 30 months in mouldy tents and now in the community where we are not accepted, some of us now have travel papers which give us the freedom to leave.”

In response to the letter, New Zealand’s immigration minister, Michael Woodhouse, said it was up to Australia to resettle people from its offshore detention camps and that New Zealand remained willing to assist.

“It is for Australia to take up the offer to utilise the up to 150 places and to date they have not done so,” he said. “As such, the places are reallocated to the annual quota and most recently the places were given to Syrian refugees.”

In a deal brokered between prime ministers Key and Julia Gillard in 2013, New Zealand agreed to accept 150 refugees from Australia’s offshore processing centres each year from 2014-15.

The quota remains in New Zealand’s forward planning for humanitarian resettlement.

But when the former Australian prime minister, Tony Abbott, was elected he effectively scrapped the deal at the Australian end, saying it would be called upon only “if and when it becomes necessary”.

“Our determination is to stop the boats and one of the ways that we stop the boats is by making it absolutely crystal clear that if you come to Australia illegally by boat you go not to New Zealand but to Nauru or Manus and you never ever come to Australia,” he said.

The Coalition government is loath to have refugees resettled in New Zealand as it is seen as undermining a fundamental tenet of the policy: that boat-borne asylum seekers will never be settled in Australia.

Refugees resettled in New Zealand can apply to become citizens after five years. New Zealand citizenship would give those people the right to travel and work in Australia.

The prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, said he believed resettlement in New Zealand would be an incentive for asylum seekers to board boats.

“I think an outcome like that could … result in creating incentives for people smugglers to get back into business,” he said.

Some refugees on Nauru have recently been granted travel documents, which would allow them to travel to another country that was willing to admit them. The visa to live in Nauru expires in five years.

Nauruan officials maintain that all refugees must ultimately be resettled in another country.

So far, 815 people have been granted refugee status on the island, including, it is understood, about 80 children. They are living in the detention centre or in the Nauruan community.

A further 543 people, including 70 children, remain in the detention centre awaiting a refugee status determination.

After Nauru and Manus Island’s first iterations as Australian immigration detention facilities – under the “Pacific Solution” between 2001 and 2008 – 705 people from those centres were resettled in Australia and 401 in New Zealand. Far smaller numbers were resettled in Sweden, Canada, Denmark and Norway.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/jan/11/new-zealands-offer-to-take-150-offshore-refugees-a-year-never-taken-up

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A Refugee Committed Suicide At Brisbane Airport An Barely Anyone Noticed

November 02, 2015 | Buzfeed Australia

Reza Alizadeh. Supplied

At around 4 a.m. last Tuesday morning, Reza Alizadeh, a 26-year-old Iranian man who had been living in Australia on a bridging visa since 2013, walked to the entrance of Brisbane International Airport.

He had been troubled for some time. Suffering from depression, he fled the Iranian city of Ahwaz by boat in 2013 and headed for Australia. He spent around three months in various detention centres before he was released into the community on a bridging visa and moved to Melbourne.

It was at this point that his already fragile mental health rapidly declined. Two troubled years, dotted with incidents of self-harm, emotional breakdowns, paranoia, and suicidal thoughts finally ended, alone at Brisbane airport when AFP officers found him hanging from a bag strap attached to a railing at around 4 a.m. on Tuesday morning.

How did it come to this? BuzzFeed News has spoken to Reza’s friends who tried desperately to get him the help he needed, as well as medical professionals who say Australia’s immigration system is giving birth to a crisis in the refugee community.

“At the end he got worse and worse. On a number of occasions he tried to harm himself and he had scars all over his body, and none of the authorities cared,” a friend of Reza’s says.

This is part of the new normal for Australia’s immigration system. For over a decade now – ever since former prime minister John Howard declared that “we will decide who comes to this country and the circumstances in which they come” – “boat people” have become a political football.

“We will decide who comes to this country and the circumstances in which they come.” John Howard launching his successful election campaign in 2001. Den Lewins / AAPIMAGE

When Labor relaxed Australia’s border protection laws in 2007, a tide of refugees attempted to reach the country by boat. Tens of thousands were intercepted and put in detention centres to be processed.

Eventually the sea of humanity making its way to our shores became too much and in 2013 a new policy was formed: no one who tried to reach Australia by boat would be settled here.

As a result, there are around 30,000 refugees currently living in Australia on bridging visas, which allow a person to live – with conditions – in the community while their refugee claims are being processed or until a more permanent home can be found for them.

The bridging visas have an upside: they’ve helped to get many refugees out of detention and into the community, where they’ve got the freedom to form friendships and communities which in theory should make life in Australia a little easier.

But advocates say the visas leave refugees in a state of abject poverty. Asylum-seekers who arrived in Australia by boat on or after August 13 2012 and are granted bridging visas are not permitted to work, meaning many rely on charity just to survive.

Former prime minister Kevin Rudd announcing that anyone who attempted to reach Australia by boat would have no chance of being settled here. AAP

People on bridging visas have no right to family reunion and cannot leave the country. They are given access to temporary accommodation but are ultimately responsible for their own lodgings. In an emergency, asylum-seekers are given access to the Community Assistance Support program which helps people to meet their basic health and welfare needs. But first there has to be an emergency.

The system is deliberately and transparently punitive. The government’s stated objective is to deter asylum-seekers from ever wanting to come to Australia by boat.

It’s these conditions which have led to many asylum-seekers suffering from severe mental health issues, advocates say.

“We lock them up and drive them crazy, then we set them free and expect them to be OK,” says Pamela Curr from the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre.

Zachary Steele is the professorial chair of trauma and mental health at St John of God Hospital and a professor of psychology at UNSW. He tells BuzzFeed News asylum-seekers and refugees are among the most vulnerable people in our society and need our protection.

“Every survey that’s been done shows that they do have a very high rate of exposure to torture and trauma backgrounds that places them in a very high risk category for mental health problems,” he says.

“The stresses of insecure residency and the post-migration difficulties associated with the restrictions of bridging visas create a harsh environment that in turn is associated with poorer mental health trajectories.”

For Reza, this manifested in severe paranoia, depression, self-harm, and suicidal thoughts. And while tragic, Reza’s story is not unique.

“We lock them up and drive them crazy, then we set them free and expect them to be OK.”

In February 2014 Rezene Mebrahta Engeda drowned himself in the Maribyrnong River upon notice of a failed asylum application.

In June 2014 a 29-year-old Sri Lankan man died as a result of self-immolation, suffering burns to 90% of his body. He had been living in community detention on a bridging visa awaiting the outcome of his refugee claim.

In March, Omid Ali Avaz, a 29-year-old Iranian man on a Humanitarian Stay (Temporary) visa, killed himself in Brisbane.

Earlier this month, Hazara man Khodayar Amini set himself alight while on a video call to two refugee workers.

Before his death, Khodayar reportedly told the refugee workers, “Red Cross killing me. Immigration killing me. I want to kill my life. I don’t have any option. They don’t give me chance. I can’t stay in detention centre.”

Khodayar Amini. Supplied.

One of the major problems, Pamela Curr says, is that many asylum-seekers suffering from mental health issues are afraid to reveal their troubles to the people who are supposed to help them.

“The asylum-seekers are really cursed. If they have an agency that’s looking after them and they go to that agency and say, ‘I’m feeling suicidal, I want to jump in front of a train, I can’t sleep, I’ve got voices in my head’ – all the marks of mental ill health – those agencies will notify the immigration department, and the next thing you know, the department will rock up and cart them off to detention. They’re in a real bind.”

Without any family in Australia, it was Reza’s friends who tried the hardest to get him help.

Reza took himself, or was taken to, at least three Melbourne hospitals or medical centres in the weeks before his death. Ten days before he died, Reza broke a mobile phone in half and attempted to slash his throat while in hospital. A short time later he was released to look after himself, friends say.

The hospitals contacted by BuzzFeed News were unable to comment, citing privacy concerns.

In Reza’s final weeks, friends say they contacted the immigration department, police, and Reza’s caseworker with AMES Australia, a government-contracted nonprofit which helps recently arrived refugees settle into Victoria.

A spokesperson for AMES told BuzzFeed News the organisation did all it could for Reza, but that his erratic behaviour in the period before his death made it very difficult to provide the care he needed:

“[Reza] was provided with the full range of services all of our asylum-seeker clients are afforded. As a person with a range of health issues he was given close case management and referred several times to healthcare providers.”

“It’s all black and white… on a number of occasions [Reza’s friend] has taken Reza to hospital, to police, to AMES, to his case worker, to immigration, and they basically said ‘he’s alright’.”

Shortly after Reza was released from the third hospital, he decided to fly to Brisbane. He felt this was the only place he was safe from the people he believed were following him. His friends helped him fly to Brisbane while informing anyone they could of their concerns for his wellbeing.

“He [Reza] got in touch with his cousin and he sent text messages that he was going to take his life. Then his cousin, on a number of occasions, contacted his case worker,” Reza’s friend says.

Melbourne police were informed of Reza’s situation, and Queensland police were subsequently informed.

It’s believed Queensland police officers contacted Reza after he arrived in Brisbane, meeting with him in a hotel room in Fortitude Valley to assess his mental health. After a conversation, Reza’s friends say, the officers left him alone, deciding he was not a danger to himself or others.

Following the meeting, Reza’s friend, also named Reza, says he contacted the department of immigration and AMES to warn them that Reza planned to end his life, but was told that nothing could be done.

“It’s all black and white… on a number of occasions [Reza’s friend] has taken Reza to hospital, to police, to AMES, to his case worker, to immigration, and they basically said ‘he’s alright’,” another friend says.

The two Rezas texted constantly over the weekend before final contact was made on Sunday evening. It’s not clear what happened between Sunday evening and Tuesday morning, but we may learn more when Queensland police hand over a report for the coroner.

It’s too late for Reza, but mental health experts say the system needs to be changed to look after people on temporary visas.

Reza in Melbourne before his death. Supplied.

“Your life is permanently on hold and you have a subjective fear that you may be returned to a situation where you fear for your wellbeing and the wellbeing of your family,” Prof Steele says.

“People do have to have their claims assessed and that does put enormous stress on them. There’s no way to solve that problem but there is a way to recognise it and to put a health and welfare framework around it that recognises that this is a vulnerable population.”

Michael Dudley, the chair of Suicide Prevention Australia, believes “torture” is not too strong a word for Australia’s current immigration system.

“The way in which the policy is giving rise to harm that the government and the department are aware of – it’s collateral damage of which they are fully informed. It’s a direct aim of the policy. It aims to cause suffering to make people leave the country.”

Dudley says the solution is at once complex and simple: time and money. He believes refugees have a sword of Damocles hanging over their head which could be resolved if more funding was dedicated to processing refugee claims as fast as possible.

“The UNHCR [United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees] needs proper funding by governments like Australia. We don’t actually have a system that is designed to do that. It’s not properly resourced,” he says.

“Mental health support could help people in these situations. Whatever support we can offer, whether mental or practical, in these dire situations, should be offered.”

Queensland police declined to comment for this story, saying it would be inappropriate as they prepare a report for the coroner.

The Department of Immigration declined several requests for comment, citing the Queensland police investigation.

Source: http://www.buzzfeed.com/robstott/a-refugees-public-suicide-and-the-system-that-let-him-down#.sqqNxEJkw

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Man dies at Brisbane airport

October 30, 2105 | brisbane times

Refugee advocates say an Iranian man endured months of depression before he died at Brisbane Airport.

Refugee advocates say an Iranian man endured months of depression before he died at Brisbane Airport. Photo: Michelle Smith

A young Iranian man took his own life at the Brisbane airport on Tuesday, after what refugee advocates believe was months of depression and despair.

Supporters told Fairfax Media the man, thought to be either 25 or 26 years old, had travelled to Brisbane recently, after his release from a Melbourne hospital.

They said he was met by police at the airport and placed in a hotel, which he later left, returning to the airport in the early hours of Tuesday morning, and suicided.

A Queensland Police spokeswoman confirmed officers attended a non-suspicious sudden death at the Brisbane Airport on Tuesday and a report was being prepared for the Coroner.

A spokeswoman for the Australian Federal Police said the Queensland Police Service were the lead agency on the investigation.

The Immigration department was contacted for comment late on Wednesday night, when Fairfax Media first learnt of the death.

The Department of Immigration and Border Protection.responded on Thursday: “This is a matter for Queensland Police please direct your enquiry to them.”

Refugee advocates in both Brisbane and Melbourne had heard of the death, claiming the man had been attempting to seek help for mental health issues when he was discharged from the Royal Melbourne Hospital last week.

Investigations are continuing

Source http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/man-dies-at-brisbane-airport-20151028-gklbig.html#ixzz3q31D47sR

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More than 20,000 asylum seekers receive work rights after years living in forced destitution

September 25, 2015 | the age

Asylum seeker Hamid, a Hazara Afghan, received work rights three weeks ago and is now working as a paver and a bricklayer.

Asylum seeker Hamid, a Hazara Afghan, received work rights three weeks ago and is now working as a paver and a bricklayer.

How sweet it is to wake to a new day – a day with a shape, a day with meaning. Hamid Ali rises early. He pours tea into a thermos, pulls on a vest and steps outside into the morning chill. Then he starts to smile.
“Two years I have been in Australia and there was nothing,” he says. “We had no permission to work, we could not go to school … all I could do was stay at home.”
Like thousands of other asylum seekers who came by boat after August 2012, Mr Ali has been under visa conditions that stopped him from getting a job and restricted him to a fraction of the dole, $31 a day, scarcely enough for rent. Days stretched into weeks, months into years.
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But this morning, his first day back on the tools, the Pakistani Hazara is standing tall, surveying the construction site where he will be working as a brickie.
“I am bricklaying the fences here,” says Mr Ali. “Soon I will hopefully have bigger projects and can do a complete house.”
Australia’s strict visa rules that have forced asylum seekers to live in destitution are now being relaxed, with the federal government rubber-stamping new work approvals in numbers not seen for years.
Statistics obtained this week reveal a staggering 22,800 asylum seekers between January and September have been granted eligibility to start earning a living.
“In the same period last year, large numbers of illegal maritime arrivals remained in detention,” a Border Force spokeswoman said.
“Many were released on Bridging Visa E without work rights. A total of 62 had work rights.”
Of 25,000 boat arrivals now living in the community on bridging visas, more than 24,400 can now work.
Migrant resettlement service AMES said more than 2000 asylum seeker clients had received work rights, up from 350 in February.
“Work is not just about a pay cheque, it is a source of pride, self-reliance, improved health and sense of self-worth,” chief executive Cath Scarth said. “It gives structure and meaning to people’s lives and it is the fabric from which our society is wrought.”
The rush of new work approvals follows the federal government lifting a stay on processing asylum seeker protection claims and has begun a “fast-track” processing system.
But the controversial system has also drawn criticism from legal groups, which say it could lead to legitimate asylum seekers being sent back to persecution in their home countries. Asylum seekers will have a single opportunity to make their claim to the department and face more stringent limits on their right to appeal a negative decision.
Asylum Seeker Resource Centre chief executive Kon Karapanagiotidis said the government was “giving with one hand while taking away with the other”.
“While it’s positive that people seeking asylum in our country have the right to work again, it comes after a long period where they were left without the ability to support themselves or their families,” he said. “Now they face the prospect of only being eligible for temporary protection from the war, violence and persecution they have escaped in their home country.”
The Brotherhood of St Laurence, which runs an asylum seeker employment program, has reported a “three-fold increase”, with 275 referrals between April and June. Spokeswoman Farah Farouque said the program was experiencing a “flurry” of new asylum seekers eager to work and contribute to society.

Source: http://www.theage.com.au/national/more-than-20000-asylum-seekers-receive-work-rights-after-years-living-in-forced-destitution-20150924-gjtvnx.html#ixzz3nTreK4bQ

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Teenage refugees take to the stage to share stories of plight, change audience perceptions in Sydney

May 10, 2015 | ABC News

Young refugees are sharing their stories of war-torn Iraq and Syria, through theatre performances in the hope it will ease the trauma of their ordeal as well as educate the Sydney community.

The Tree of Life performance from Treehouse Theatre group at the Casula Powerhouse has designed a production to help the teenagers share their experiences.

Among the group of young refugees is Simon Oshana, who fled to Lebanon from Syria in 2012, before being granted refugee status in Australia.

Simon, 16, said he was 13-years-old and his life changed forever while playing soccer with his friends in the village of Tel Nasri in north-eastern Syria.

I thought ‘it’s easy, they just come here by boat, get a visa’ but no – it’s totally different.

Aisha Hawli, student from the Australian International Academy

He said rockets fired by rebel forces, ravaged the village.

“I saw the planes and rockets and everything,” he said. “They were so close to me.”

The 13-year-old ran for cover and found his cousin Nino had been killed in the attack.

“They brought him to the hospital and he was dead,” Simon said.

“I saw him in front of me lying down with all his body injured and blood all over his body.

“I’m still living that nightmare.”

‘1000-year-old village bombed into oblivion’

Last month, Simon learned that the ancient Assyrian town where he grew up, was destroyed by the Islamic State militants.

“My 1000-year-old village was bombed into nothing, bombed into oblivion,” he said in the performance.

Two weeks ago, the 16-year-old said he found out on Facebook that his best friend was killed while fighting with Kurdish Peshmerga and Assyrian forces against IS.

“I didn’t believe it, I straight away messaged his brother and he said ‘it’s true’,” he said.

“It was a shock to me to see my best friend, who sat next to me in the school for many years, to see his picture on Facebook, dead.”

Simon said he used the theatre production to share experiences that he previously struggled to express.

“At the beginning, I didn’t tell anyone my story… I wasn’t that brave to tell my story because I’d cry straight away,” he said.

“Now I can control my story and tell it easily to the people.”

Iraqi sisters Athmar, 14, and Asrar Habeb, 16, fled Iraq with their family in 2013 after their cousin was kidnapped.

But they said the Tree of Life theatre production has helped with getting through their trauma.

“I feel good [that] the things that are in my heart, [go] out to people,” Athmar said.

“They know my stories.”

Audience perception of refugees’ plight changed

Audience member Aisha Hawli who is a student at the Australian International Academy said the performance changed her attitude towards refugees.

“It really showed you that refugees go through a lot more than us having been born in Australia and having a better life,” she said.

“I thought ‘it’s easy, they just come here by boat, get a visa’ but no – it’s totally different.”

Other school students praised the performers for their bravery in sharing their stories.

“If that were to be me in those situations, I don’t think I’d be courageous as they were,” Gabriella Prude from Miller Technology High School said.

“I can’t even imagine going through the things they’ve gone through.”

Marcello Ralph from the same school said “it was really emotional” and “it’s just a really eye-opening experience for everyone in this theatre”.

Dr Ken Edge, principal of Miller Technology High School, thanked the performers publicly at the end of the performance.

“Your stories are amazing, they challenge our beliefs,” he said.

Performance helps heal trauma

Ruth Hartcher-O’Brien, artistic director of Treehouse Theatre, said it was difficult for the performers to open up as their experiences are raw and ongoing.

“It’s bad enough telling stories of trauma that have happened previously,” she said.

“Horrible, sad deaths, kidnappings, bombings and you leave it and you come to a new life in Australia.

“But these stories where they’re in Australia and they’re still experiencing [trauma] and their families are still experiencing deaths, kidnappings and the sweep of [the Islamic State].”

Ms Hartcher-O’Brien said the drama program was designed to help the teenagers control their emotions through theatre.

The reaction they get from the audience just feeds their soul.

Catherine Maguire-Donvito, co-directer and counsellor

“They’ve got some control, but the actual telling of it is heartbreaking,” she said.

“They sob and sob in those first sessions when we’re gathering their stories.

“They still tell their stories through their tears to all these audience members and they’re actually crying.”

Co-director and school counsellor Catherine Maguire-Donvito said the teenagers learn to juggle mixed emotions.

“It’s really important for the kids to understand you can be happy and sad at the same time,” she said.

“You don’t have to be scared of the powerful and negative feelings.”

She said the performers’ involvement allowed them to feel a sense of significant accomplishment.

“The reaction they get from the audience just feeds their soul,” Ms Maguire-Donvito said.

“It is just a joyful experience for them and that’s what it’s all about.”

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-10/refugees-take-to-the-stage-to-share-stories/6456402

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Baby Ferouz and his asylum seeking family released from Darwin detention

January 20, 2015 | ABC News

Ferouz and Latifar

Ferouz and Latifar

An asylum seeker couple and their Brisbane-born son, Ferouz, have been released from detention in Darwin.

The Myuddin family, who have been detention for 14 months, have been involved in a long-running legal battle with the Federal Government arguing the boy deserved a protection visa as he was born in Australia.

Last month the Coalition announced Ferouz and 30 other babies, born to illegal maritime arrivals, would be allowed to apply for short-term visas while their families’ refugee claims were assessed.

Ferouz was born in Brisbane’s Mater Hospital in November 2013 after his mother, Latifar, was transferred from the detention centre on Nauru due to concerns about her pregnancy.

The family including his father and two siblings arrived on Christmas Island from Myanmar three months before Ferouz’s birth in September 2013.

They were fleeing persecution as minority Rohingyas in Myanmar.

Before the Immigration Department’s short-term visa announcement, lawyers for the family had tried unsuccessfully in the courts to challenge the department’s decision to deny him a protection visa.

The family’s lawyer Murray Watt said the family’s release from detention in Darwin was the next step in a long fight.

“These families are now released from detention and they will have the right to apply for a three-year refugee visa,” Mr Watt said.

“They’ll still have to go through the process. They’ll still have to show they genuinely fear persecution if they’re returned to their home country but at least they now have that opportunity.

“This is a really good step forward, that at last the Government have come to it’s senses and recognised, at least for these children, continuing to keep them in detention is not the proper thing to do.

“It does give these families the first step towards potentially staying in Australia on a more long-term basis.”

Mr Watt also said the Myuddins’ release was “a long time coming”.

“Ferouz has spent every night since leaving hospital living in detention and now finally, after more than a year he has been released, along with his parents and siblings, to join relatives living in Melbourne,” he said.

“For Ferouz’s parents in particular this is very special, they have never stopped fighting for a fair go for their children in seeking a better life and they are now finally able to start making that a reality.”

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-20/baby-ferouz-and-his-family-released-from-darwin-detention/6026628

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Last remaining Christmas Island asylum seeker children moved to the mainland

December 24, 2014 | ABC News

The last asylum seeker children being detained on Christmas Island have been moved to the mainland.

The last asylum seeker children being detained on Christmas Island have been moved to the mainland.

The last asylum seeker children being detained on Christmas Island have been moved to the mainland, Immigration Minister Scott Morrison says.

Mr Morrison said a total of 194 people in family groups, including 94 children, were transferred on three separate charter flights from Christmas Island over the last week

“These families are now being accommodated at the Bladin Point facility in Darwin while arrangements continue to release them into the community,” he said.

He said it had always been the Government’s policy to place as many children into the community as possible, especially young children.

“The Government has been reducing the number of children in held detention across the country since coming to office,” he said.

The minister said moving the children to the mainland was “consistent with the Government’s commitment following the passage of legislation to resolve Labor’s asylum legacy caseload”.

“A record number of more than 8,000 children arrived on illegal boats under the previous government.

“In July last year a baby was among 18 people who died at sea in attempts to reach Australia illegally by boat.”

He said asylum seekers who are transferred to offshore processing centres will continue to be assessed by the Governments of Nauru and Papua New Guinea in line with Australia’s agreements with both countries.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-21/asylum-children-moved-off-christmas-island/5981604

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